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The Desire of Lacan
J
ACQUES-ALAIN MILLER

Femininity between Goodness and Act
S
LAVOJ ZIZEK

A Case of Borgian Psychosis
M
ARCO MAUAS

Lacan's Purloined Linguistics
A
DRIAN JOHNSTON

The Body's Organs and Cindy Sherman's Face
J
OAN COPJEC

Comme des Garçons
J
OSEFINA AYERZA

Stepping into History
P
EGGY PHELAN

Interview with
Philip-Lorca diCorcia


























        

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Josefina Ayerza

Lacanian Ink 14 is undertaking Jacques Lacan's The Seminar, Book XX, On Feminine Sexuality, the Limits of Love and Knowledge: Encore as its main topic.

If the topic is the subject, likely to be a symptom if only for a while, each author sets out to express the very particular way him/her happens to enjoy the actual subject. Again, let the vernal reader enjoy the said expression if only for a while, don't we want to structure around it? As formalized by Jacques-Alain Miller, "Lacan confers a positive overtone to negative transference: in order to perform a skillful reading we need to de-suppose the author's knowledge. This well-known seminar is articulated around what he considers his own negative transference with Freud..." To discuss with Slavoj Zizek, "Breaking the Waves is the utmost 'male chauvinist' film celebrating and elevating into a sublime act of sacrifice the role which is forcefully imposed on women in patriarchal societies, that of serving as the support of male masturbatory fantasies?" Joan Copjec's apperception of desire has more than illustrating relevance, "the mouth is no longer simply that which ingests or spews out, but also and importantly that which kisses and sensuously sucks." Adrian Johnston, epitomizes parole in the proclamation that, "I don't love her;" the sentence veiling potential permutations, "It's not her that I love, but somebody else, I love her because she reminds me of a previous love..." In Marco Mauas' reproduction of a dialogue with a psychotic patient you can read, "Here comes to the studio this girl, she is the queen of the world, in the street you understand how beautiful they are, yet in the studio she is but a girl." In any case reading Peggy Phelan's lacanian poem will bring an impasse, "Now there is space to hold other bodies, but so far she holds only bodies of water."

 

Edy Ferguson, She is trying to disappear, video, painted text on the wall, assorted objects, 1998


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