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The Birth of the Intimate
[excerpt]

 

 

Gérard Wajcman

translated by Barbara P. Fulks

 

To resume again...

Religion,
Psychoanalysis
J
ACQUES-ALAIN
MILLER

The Supreme
Luxury
M
EHDI BELHAJ
KACEM

The Birth of
the Intimate
G
ÉRARD WAJCMAN

Jews, Christians,
and other
Monsters
S
LAVOJ ZIZEK

A Conversation
with Alain Badiou
M
ARIO GOLDENBERG

Fifteen Theses on
Contemporary Art
A
LAIN BADIOU

Katy Grannan
C
ATHY LEBOWITZ
interviews
JOSEFINA AYERZA

Hirakawa imageLooking back on the historical conditions of the birth of the tableau as a modern form — which, in the Renaissance, begins to put an end to the reign of medieval polyptique, independent of the movements of thought which are competing for a mathematical vision of space and before the recovery of a "humanist" meaning of art — the idea of the tableau as an open window, the deeply distressing invention of Leone Battista Alberti in his De Pictura published in Florence in 1435, is a logical sudden appearance. It issues directly from an intractable fact: as Yves Depelsenaire writes, "we are fundamentally gazed upon beings; in the spectacle of the world, there is always an Other who in some way is looking at us; in other words, we are always a little framed in the skylight of the phantasm of the Other, with all that this suggests of discomfort, of embarrassment or of anguish." And I would add: of alienation. The window of the painting as a response to the gaze of the Other; our window for seeing, as opposed to the skylight of the Other in which we are seen; to see through the window in order to be seen no longer by the Other in his window.



[...]
 


Art: Noritoshi Hirakawa, La Fontaine, c-print, 2001
courtesy of the artist.

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